My Love/Hate Relationship with Live-Tweeting

So, I’ve recently come across some extremely mixed feelings when checking my twitter feed in the morning, and all of them have to do with live-tweeting.

On the one hand, I completely understand why actors would want to live-tweet their show – It makes fans feel more connected, it gives fans an inside look at the making of the show (much like DVD commentaries, which I personally love), and it’s a free way to promote themselves.

On the other hand, people who follow live-tweeters end up with pages upon pages that look like this:

Live Tweeting

I love me some J-Pad (Although not as much as Jensen Ackles), but he is frequent live-tweeter and filler-upper of my twitter.

It also means that people who choose to/have to record a show on their trusty DVR could have spoilers ruined for them when they check twitter (with no warning), so it’s really only beneficial for folks who are on twitter while they watch their shows.

Personally, when I am watching a show that I love, I don’t have my eye on my phone – I’m actually watching the show. Not to smack people who do feel the need to multitask while watching TV; I just prefer to give all of my attention to a show, because it allows me to enjoy it a bit more.

But, even without watching the show, it is still interesting to hear about what was going on behind the scenes, and actors are generally pretty humorous about everything, to further enhance the viewer’s enjoyment of the show.

Hence, I am torn; I love/hate live-tweeting, and I don’t know if I should embrace the background information on a show I haven’t watched yet or weed out the live-tweeters from my twitter feed.

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Don’t Judge a Thing by it’s Fandom

Recently, I was listening to a podcast by a friend of mine, in which she and her husband discuss pop culture tidbits and other awesomeness. I enjoy listening to podcasts to and from work, because it makes the drive go by faster and it makes me feel like I have friends in the car (it gets lonely, guys).

In the episode that I listened to the other day, though, my friend’s husband was discussing a book that he wrote (props to him, man) in which the main villain was an evil doctor. Because of this, he was referred to as The Doctor throughout the book, which caused a lot of negative feedback from people who are super fans of Doctor Who.

Now, fans of Doctor Who, or Whovians, are a special kind of fan, in that they are obsessive to the point of crazy, and highly defensive of negative ideas or portrayals of pretty much any character from the show (even villains can cause a soft spot in Doctor Who – Whovian life is not always black and white).

Because of this obsessiveness, I can completely see people taking his story the wrong way, being offended that the villain is called The Doctor (“How dare you use that name for someone evil!”), and hurt by the fact that he didn’t know that in Doctor Who, the main character is referred to as The Doctor, which is common knowledge for people who have see the show (but not common knowledge for anyone else).

Doctor-Who-Matt-Smith.-co

Original photo co. BBC
Also, I just re-watched “Dinosaurs on a Spaceship”, and I absolutely love this line.

Now, I personally identify with Whovians, because I love a good story (and they really are fantastic in Doctor Who), but I can also see where he was coming from. Fans of Doctor Who can be crazy, and that can be a huge turn off.

I myself was hesitant to start watching Doctor Who at first, because I knew people who were so crazy in love with the show that I couldn’t imagine it to be that good, and I would only end up disappointed. I’ve been burned by crazy fans before (a former roommate told me to read Twilight, because “the story is kind of lame, but the writing is really good”. Lies.), and I wasn’t really looking to put myself out there for a show that I wasn’t already attached to.

So I get it – crazy fans are crazy, and they can easily turn people off of a show, movie, comic, book, whatever. It’s a fine line being a fan of something. You have to ease people into it, like  stepping into a hot bath – dip their toes with a clip or two, and hope that it is comfortable enough for them to want to slip in.

The thing about fandoms is, people are always going to be fanatical about them. That’s the point – they love this thing so much that they can’t help but want to push it onto you too – they want to share their wonder with the people around them, so they can wonder together.

But shows are not the fandom – the boy who builds his own life-size dalek, the couple who have a Star Trek wedding at Comic Con, or the girl who writes erotic fanfiction of Supernatural and tries to publish it – they are not a representative of the thing itself, or even the fandom. They are the extremes.

So please, don’t judge a thing by it’s fandom – you could be missing out on something life-changing.

Bow Ties are Cool

Sometimes, my sister and I have awesome conversations that should be shared with the world. And sometimes, I’m really funny and want people to know about it.

No, she is not normally put into my phone as "Seester", but since she is my seester, I figured it would be fine.

No, she is not normally put into my phone as “Seester”, but since she is my seester, I figured it would be fine.

Seriously, you should take the time to Google women in bow ties. It is not a good look for anyone involved, I’m sorry to say.

Literary Desires

Have you ever had one of those moments in books where you get the overwhelming DESIRE to do something described in what you’re reading? I’m not talking about some food that sounds good (although that totally happens – the Turkish Delight from The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe? Sounds delicious in the book! In real life, it’s basically just nasty covered in powdered sugar, and I am not the only one who feels this way.)

I’m talking about an itching need to do something you read about – something you would never do in real life, but you can imagine yourself doing it in a past life, and crave the feeling again.

Recently I was reading Dorothy Allison’s Bastard out of Carolina, where she describes a whole family of people who drink and chew tobacco and do all sorts of things that you would expect a family of hillbillies to do, and I got the urge to do something that I have never in my life wanted to do: smoke a cigarette.

The way she describes it, it just sounded so comforting and normal,  like it was something you would naturally do (which is true for a lot of people, I guess). I was shocked at my urge to smoke a cigarette, because I come from not only a family of non-smokers, but a family that is heavy into the medical field (I have a lot of nurses in my family). I know that if I ever started smoking, I would get bombarded with factoids, pictures and other paraphernalia that is used to scare smokers into quitting. It’s never really been an option to me, and even at my most rebellious (which, lets face it, was nowhere near rebellious), I would never have even considered starting to smoke.

To me, it is a sign of an excellent writer that they can spark such natural desire in a reader to do something so uncharacteristic.

The Best Way to Change

I look through my spam inbox frequently, which has resulted in Spam Haikus, a series of haiku poems using only words found in spam emails. It’s challenging and wonderful and makes me feel creative while I sit in a cubicle and stare at HTML text.

But since starting a blog, I’ve come across a new kind of spam. You all know the kind; comments that say things like

spam

and

spam

Well, some of these are strangely lovely, and I’ve decided to use their words (combined throughout the weeks) as part of a poem. All I’ve added is a bit of punctuation, and that’s more for my own sanity than anything else.

Here is is.

wishing for blogging
is not merely for safekeeping –
Luck is more advanced than search engines.

Money and freedom is the best way to change
what is so perfect about modern-day democracy
as well as the marketplace of ideas.

And irrespective,
Your perspective… is the best way to change.
i think it will be helpful.

this method climbs into your current kidney
inflicting indication within just a number –
a fastidious one.

Shiny
really does understand gentle generating looks
Nevertheless, confused.

As strange as it is, I’m awfully fond of this. Although, I sincerely believe that it can be summed up in the last line.

 

Real Cowboys Wear Bow Ties

I came across the top picture in my Facebook feed, and felt the need to modify it.

cowboys

You’re welcome, Whovians.

 

The Time My Boss Bought Me Socks

I was going to write about how much I hate all of the news articles about digging up an empty space where Hoffa is supposed to be buried, but I decided the story of how my boss bought me socks was more fun.

This was at my old old job, the first full-time job I had right out of college. I was working at a small family-owned company, where there were literally four of us (and I was the only one not family), so it was really laid back. Like, jeans and tennis shoes with a cat in my lap laid back.

My boss had bought his wife (who worked with us) some boots for Christmas, and had them shipped to the office (because why not?). To make the order large enough for free shipping, he added a pair of men’s dress socks for himself. (Why he decided on dress socks, I will never know, since the man lives in bleach-splattered t-shirts and Birkenstocks.)

When the packaged arrived, he opened the box and went, “Why did I buy these? These are awful!” Not knowing what awful thing he had inadvertently bought, I turned around to find him holding an awesome pair of argyle socks!

socks

Nevermind the sensible black pumps.

 

Seriously, they’re fantastic.

Because I liked them so much, and because he would never dream of wearing argyle socks, my boss gave them to me.

Even though that relationship ended on a poor note (which is a whole other story), I still think of my boss and that job when I wear them. Which is a lot, because I only have about three pairs of work-appropriate socks now that I have to dress up every day.